SHEMYA WWII
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Shemya Coordinates Map

If anyone knows who the photographer was for photos 1, 2 and/or 7, or can identify any of the folks in those pictures, please email the info to me! Thanks.


Shemya...baby it's cold out there! #1. The folks occupying Shemya and Attu during WWII blazed the trail for the rest of us. Compared to these guys, we had it relatively easy! While they lived in tents during their first year of occupation, we had warm concrete buildings, bowling alleys, theater, gymnasium, etc. However, all these new amenities didn't keep the snow from blowing up our pant legs, either. I believe this photo to be taken sometime during the winter of 1943-1944. The first GIs to occupy Shemya lived in tents for the first year. The second year they lived in Quonset huts. This photo, along with #2 and #7 were found by George Smith in Shemya's Photo Hobby Shop as glass slides, reproduced and posted here along with a few slides from Attu.
   
man from tent #2. This picture was apparently taken from a tent. The inscription indicates this picture was taken on Shemya, AK, and more than likely during the winter of 1943-1944. A guess is that the above picture was taken on Shemya as well. Notice the similarity in the landscape. This poor guy had to freeze his buns off just going to chow! Notice the fine Chinaware?
   
#3. This picture is of Walter H. Knight, taken on Shemya, Pacific side of runway. 1943-1944.
   
#4. Also of Walter H. Knight, Shemya Island. 1943-1944.
   
#5. One of Shemya's fine chefs, Mr. Goldberg of New York City. Shemya, 1943-1944. (Walter H. Knight)
   
#6. Bane Barrick, Shemya; Chowtime! Glad to hear another guy besides me was in the 344th Fighter Squadron.This must have been early 1944. Notice, I have shadows in my picture. A rare day on Shemya. My first stay on Shemya was from June 1943 UNTIL June 1945. I was on Shemya for 22 months straight the first time!
   
P-38 Buzzing #7. This picture could have been taken on either Attu or Shemya. It is, as the inscription indicates, a P-38 buzzing the area.
   
#8. Jeff Marksbury's father flew this B-24D, SN 123973, attached to the 404th Bomb Squadron, Shemya, Alaska. This plane was transferred to the 404th from Casper, Wyoming where the crew was formed. It flew 30 missions before it was replaced by a B-24J. This B-24D was then scrapped for parts. 
   
Dan Lange & Friend #9. Dan Lange (standing) in front of the 11th Fighter Squadron Headquarters. Dan brought the dog, Red, home with him on the ship when he left Shemya. The 11th was just north of the big runway in about the middle of the island. Click HERE for more about "Red."
   
Don Lange's P-38s, #1 #10. Dan Lange, the Crew Chief of Shemya's P-38 "Little Butch," tailnumber 121, sent this one in. This photo was taken on Shemya around 1945-1946.
   
P-38, Shemya #2 #11. Shemya P-38 #121 "Little Butch" submitted by Dan Lange.
   
P-38, Shemya #3 #12. This P-38 was known as "Little Butch," and was submitted by Dan Lange. Try painting names on government property today!
   
P-38, Shemya #4 #13. The business end of P-38 "Little Butch." Submitted by Dan Lange.
   
Little Butch on Attu, Winter 1945 #14. George Villasenor, enlisted at 16 years old, was stationed on Attu at the age of 17 (or 18) during WWII as a Naval Aerial Photographer. He was sent to photograph a P-38 with "Little Butch" painted on it's nose (and 121 painted on its fuselage)  that had skidded off the Attu runway and ended up in a ditch. Does it look familiar? Go to Attu site, and see "Little Butch" photos by George Villasenor.

 

Last Updated: 30 December 2013 09:57